Weight and Stuff Report – 22 March 2012

Back down again today in another burst of randomness, or something.

I took the 5D Mark II and my Sigma 12-24mm lens for a walk at lunchtime. My main aim was to get an updated wide view of the Millennium Bridge to improve on this one that I took in 2009:

With added bollards

With added bollards

With the Sigma 12-24mm lens at its widest, the full-frame sensor of the 5D MK II captures a wider view of the bridges...

And here it is:

As intended

As intended

The conditions were very different – last time, it was the height of summer, so quite naturally it was a grey, miserable day with loads of dramatic cloud, while today it was the tail end of winter with a hint of spring, so naturally it was bright and sunny, with the sun creating a lot of glare at upper left. Still, I think the improvement of the view can be clearly made out.

I walked back up via the Black Gate:

Black Gate

Black Gate

Then past the Stephenson memorial, which will soon be uncovered after a major restoration job – I’ll be getting some pictures of that soon.

And from there, I took a roundabout route to the office, as you can see here:

Click to play

Click to play

You can click on the map to play with it, should you be so inclined.

4 thoughts on “Weight and Stuff Report – 22 March 2012

    1. Les Post author

      Everything on the river is regulated by a thing called the Port of Tyne Authority. When the Gateshead Millennium Bridge was proposed, a person in a senior position in the authority decided that it was necessary to add measures to prevent vessels from colliding with the bridge. It was argued at the time that (1) not much actual shipping came that far up river and (2) most people driving the ships that came that far up river weren’t actually blind, but the authority insisted, and so the bloody bollards were added.

      Move forward a decade, and the responsible person has long since retired, shipping on the Tyne has declined even further[1], and the Port of Tyne Authority agreed with Gateshead Council[2] that the bloody bollards could indeed be dispensed with. The (substantial) cost of removing them[3] turned out to be less than the ongoing maintenance cost, and so they have gone. It would have happened last year, but the crane originally scheduled to do the work was tied up on another job, and we had to wait for another one to become available.

      [1] With rare exceptions, the bridge opens only for pleasure trips. It’s part of the trip to pass under the bridge in its open state. Must get on one of those one day..
      [2] Who commissioned the bridge in the first place – ran a design competition and quite remarkably chose the coolest and prettiest entry

  1. Mr Dull

    Like the new Photo.
    The sunlight makes the sage really stand out and look great.
    The big ugly concrete lump on the far left horizon has disappeared which also improves things.
    The only bad thing is the Swing bridge seems to have disappeared as well or is that my eyesight getting worse again.

    1. Les Post author

      Thanks – the removal of the concrete lump is a big improvement. The Swing Bridge is still there, but a little hard to see at that scale – I’ll post a cropped version later.

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