Fujifilm X100S Digital Camera – First Impressions

It doesn’t seem that long since I got the Fujifilm X100. Well, it isn’t that long. I wrote my first post about it less than six months ago, and I’ve been having a lot of fun with it. It took me a while to start really getting to grips with it, but over the last couple of months I’ve taken it out more than the Canon 5D Mark III. And while it’s a lovely camera, there’s always room for improvement. And that’s what Fuji have done here. Physically, it’s almost identical to its predecessor, which is a Very Good Thing Indeed. The retro look, easy handling and generally nice feel of the X100 all helped make it something a bit special. But the 12MP sensor has been replaced with a 16.3MP one using Fuji’s fancy new X-Trans technology, which does some unusual things which (and I’m omitting anything technical here) allow more detail to be recorded than would normally be expected from the given resolution.

There’s new on-board processing, new filters, some extra toys including panoramas and double exposure and a speeded up auto focus. The electronic viewfinder gets a much higher resolution, which is excellent – the X100’s EVF converted me to the idea that EVFs might not actually be rubbish after all, and this one seems from my brief tests so far to be even better.

A few controls have changed – there’s now a Q button for quick access to frequently used settings, which avoids delving deep into the menus, which have also been tidied up and put over more tabs. And one thing that I, like a lot of X100 users, found annoying has been fixed. The OK button now sticks out a bit more and is much easier to hit the first time, without accidentally pressing up, down, left or right.

This time round, there’s no all-black limited edition, but I’m more than happy with the brushed aluminium on the X100S, which has a very classy look to it. As I’m selling my X100 as a complete kit, I’ve added the new Fuji case, which in a quite lovely development, has a hatch in the bottom to allow access to the battery and memory card without having to take the case off. That’s a relatively minor thing, but very welcome.

As you might expect, it was dull, wet and grey at lunchtime, so I didn’t get to give it a proper test, but I did get a few  nice images. This is a detail of the lovely tiling in Newcastle’s Central Arcade. The image is a JPG straight out of the camera – all Lightroom has done is resize it and add a watermark.

Central Arcade Detail

Central Arcade Detail

Camera: X100S
Aperture: ƒ/5.6
Shutter speed: 1/35s
Focal length: 23mm
ISO: 800
Taken: 12 April, 2013
Location: 54° 58.3882′ 0″ N 1° 36.792′ 0″ W

Lovely rich tones there…

This is a slightly edited raw file:

Central Arcade

Central Arcade

Camera: X100S
Aperture: ƒ/8
Shutter speed: 1/35s
Focal length: 23mm
ISO: 250
Taken: 12 April, 2013
Location: 54° 58.3882′ 0″ N 1° 36.792′ 0″ W

Getting a good exposure in the Arcade is always interesting. Even on dull days, the glass roof is quite bright, the lamps a bright, and the shop fronts are variable. I may do some more work on this and a couple of other images later.

And finally, a quick macro test. This was hand-held and just fired off at my desk. Again, this is a JPG which has just been cropped and resized.

Tigger, cropped

Tigger, cropped

Camera: X100S
Aperture: ƒ/2.8
Shutter speed: 1/70s
Focal length: 23mm
ISO: 200
Taken: 12 April, 2013
Location: 54° 58.3882′ 0″ N 1° 36.792′ 0″ W

So, first impressions – this is a very nice camera indeed. I’ll need to spend some time learning how to work it properly, but that’s a Good Thing. If nothing else, it’ll encourage me to take lots more photographs.

 

 

5 thoughts on “Fujifilm X100S Digital Camera – First Impressions

    1. Les Post author

      Thank you, Mr Silly. :wave:

      Unless you’re using a very small screen, the image you can see is substantially larger than the Tigger is in reality.

  1. Pingback: Weight and Stuff Report – 13 April 2013 | Losing it

  2. Pingback: Weight and Stuff Report – 15 April 2013 | Losing it

  3. Pingback: April 2013 Round-up | Losing it

Comments are closed.