Fujinon 50-140mm f2.8 WR OIS XF Lens

I’ve been dithering about getting this lens for a while. My addled little brain kept telling me that it wanted to upgrade my lovely Fujifilm X100S to the newer and generally nicer X100T, and even made me pick one up and play with it in Jessops a couple of times. But if I bought that, it would be quite a while before I could afford to buy any more lenses for my equally lovely but in a different way Fujifilm X-T1. And as Fuji have been releasing some serious lenses lately, that seemed like a Bad Idea. So, yesterday, as I hinted in yesterday’s exciting daily thingy, I finally stopped dithering and waved plastic in the general direction of Wex Photographic (my brain still wants to call them Warehouse Express, of course). And a typically well-wrapped parcel arrived at work today: big box with the contents generously wrapped in loads of bubble wrap.

So what have I got here? Well, it’s the biggest and most expensive lens I’ve bought for the Fuji system, for a start. And while it is quite big, it balances well enough on the X-T1 for comfortable hand-held use. But then, you might recall me having some rather large lenses on the Canon 5D MkIII. This is a lot smaller than those…

The 50-140mm range, thanks to the wonders of crop factors[1], this lens is almost exactly the equivalent of a 70-200mm lens on a full-frame camera like my old 5D. Almost the equivalent of the Sigma 70-200 f/2.8 lens I had, in fact. Yes, that f/2.8 business accounts for the size and price – it takes some pretty big and heavy glass, not to mention serious engineering to make a zoom lens that has a moderately wide maximum aperture throughout its length. And it takes a bit more of the same for the lens to remain the same length while zooming – all the zoom is internal, so it doesn’t get longer when you take it to 140mm, which makes it easier to balance and generally better to work with. One big advantage this lens has over the Sigma is that it comes with Fuji’s image stabilisation technology, which is generally very good indeed – take a look at the exposure times on some of the low-light photos below – not bad at all for hand-holding a pretty big lens.

And if you’re not into hand-held photography, the lens does come with a tripod collar, which can be easily removed (which is what I’ve done with it).

So, what can it do? Well, here’s a view from the wider end:

Monument

Monument

Camera: X-T1
Aperture: ƒ/8
Shutter speed: 1/40s
Focal length: 50mm
ISO: 6400
Taken: 3 March, 2015

That one’s been straightened and tweaked a bit in Lightroom, but here’s the obligatory closer look at Earl Grey, taken from the same position. Just for laughs, this one is an unedited JPG SOOC (straight out of camera, as some people like to say):

Obligatory Earl Grey

Obligatory Earl Grey

Camera: X-T1
Aperture: ƒ/8
Shutter speed: 1/30s
Focal length: 140mm
ISO: 6400
Taken: 3 March, 2015

Or a closer look at the Monument Mall[2] dome:

Lights

Lights

Camera: X-T1
Aperture: ƒ/8
Shutter speed: 1/25s
Focal length: 115mm
ISO: 6400
Taken: 3 March, 2015

And finally, this is one of the Central Arcade domes:

Top Knot (SOOC)

Top Knot (SOOC)

Camera: X-T1
Aperture: ƒ/4
Shutter speed: 1/100s
Focal length: 140mm
ISO: 6400
Taken: 3 March, 2015

That’s another unedited one.

More playing will follow, with more photos to come.

[1] Technical detail omitted to avoid boring those who know all about them and bewildering those who don’t