Weight and Stuff Report – 13 November 2014

Weight: 219 pounds (15 stone 9 pounds, 99.3 kg)
Steps taken: 3,740

And up again today, in a not unexpected bounce.

Here’s one I took in Hexham earlier this year. I’ve given it a moody black and white treatment, which I quite like…

Hexham Abbey

Hexham Abbey

Camera: X-E2
Aperture: ƒ/8
Shutter speed: 1/180s
Focal length: 14mm
ISO: 200
Location: 54° 58.3287′ 0″ N 2° 6.1728′ 0″ W
Taken: 15 March, 2014

Weight and Stuff Report – 11 November 2014

Weight: 217.2 pounds (15 stone 7.2 pounds, 98.5 kg)
Steps taken: 4,180

Down again today, in another wild oscillation thingy.

This is something I belatedly noticed on my recent visit to the National Railway Museum. In all my previous visits, I’d never spotted those little swooshy lines on the inner parts of Mallard’s number:

4

4

Camera: X-T1
Aperture: ƒ/4.5
Shutter speed: 1/10s
Focal length: 23.3mm
ISO: 6400
Taken: 7 November, 2014

Weight and Stuff Report – 10 November 2014

Weight: 219.8 pounds (15 stone 9.8 pounds, 99.7 kg)
Steps taken: 4,522

Up again today, never mind, etc….

This is the interior of a travelling post office. Much of Britain’s mail used to be sorted on these trains, with clever mechanisms used to load and drop off bags at various points on the route.

Travelling Post Office

Travelling Post Office

Camera: X-T1
Aperture: ƒ/7.1
Shutter speed: 1/2s
Focal length: 18mm
ISO: 6400
Taken: 7 November, 2014

Weight and Stuff Report – 9 November 2014

Weight: Good question
Steps taken: Not many

Today’s weight is a bit of a mystery, as I sort of forgot to weigh myself[1]. Had a quiet day in, psychologically preparing myself for returning to work tomorrow  :wah:

Here’s a helpful notice from the NRM:

..and sway...

..and sway…

Camera: X-T1
Aperture: ƒ/6.4
Shutter speed: 1/9s
Focal length: 49.4mm
ISO: 6400
Taken: 7 November, 2014

[1] And I may be giving away the secret that this post might not have been typed on the day it says it was

Peter F Hamilton – The Abyss Beyond Dreams

Peter F Hamilton is back with another wrist-straining[1] novel. This is first in a two part series he’s calling Chronicle of the Fallers, and it ties in with both the Commonwealth Saga and the Void Trilogy. Previously, a  fleet of starships heading out to start a new culture well away from the Commonwealth, find themselves in a strange environment that they realise is the Void – a strange and growing thingy at the centre of the galaxy, where their technology begins to fail, and from which there is no escape. They run into some seriously nasty alien wossnames with a clever line in absorbing and replacing people (in an Invasion of the Bodysnatchers only worse kind of way…). Enough of them survive to land on at least one planet, and found a society, which develops as best it can with limited technology and frequent attacks from the alien wossnames, which arrive as eggs falling from a structure known as the Forest. Which is why they’re called Fallers…

Back in the Commonwealth, Nigel Sheldon (co-inventor of the wormhole technology and effective founder of the Commonwealth) thinks he can do something about the Void (which it is believed will one day expand to consume the whole galaxy), and with help from the Raiel sends a clone of himself in to find out more. He’s worked out that the city that was the heart of the world we saw in the Void trilogy was actually the remains of a Raiel ship,lost in the ovid long before.

So he arrives, and learns that contrary to expectation, there is more than one human-inhabited planet in the Void, and the one he’s found doesn’t have a Raeil ship..

Much fun follows, with the usual multiple viewpoints, movement backward and forward in time, characters not knowing what’s going on, and much more.

Nigel believes he can bring the Void to an end, and return the people inside to the Commonwealth. His plan to achieve this leads to a lot of change, and not all of it was what he was expecting.

Clever stuff, wide open for the next volume…

[1] I’m sure it made my Kindle slightly heavier

Weight and Stuff Report – 8 November 2014

Weight: 218.8 pounds (15 stone 8.8 pounds, 99.2 kg)
Steps taken: 6,711

Up again today, as the oscillations continue.

It was back to the usual Saturday routine today – breakfast and shopping. I then decided to make a third attempt at my plan for a walk along the seafront from Seaburn to Roker. This time, there were no Metro-related issues, but by the time the Metro left Newcastle, the weather was looking nasty enough to put me off having a walk along an exposed seafront. So, I stayed on to Sunderland, and went to the Museum and Winter Gardens, where I was happy to see the BP Portrait Award exhibition, which contained a remarkable variety of painting styles.

After that, I got a bus towards South Shields, with the vague idea of getting out somewhere along the coast. But the weather was still a bit nasty, and as it happens there’s a load of drainage work being done along the stretch of seafront I’d have wanted to walk along, so I stayed on the bus, had a short wander around South Shields, then cam home.

Here’s another photo from yesterday’s York trip. This is the quite large Chinese engine, given some Tonality Pro treatment:

Chinese Engine

Chinese Engine

Camera: X-T1
Aperture: ƒ/7.1
Shutter speed: 1/10s
Focal length: 18mm
ISO: 6400
Taken: 7 November, 2014

Weight and Stuff Report – 7 November 2014

Weight: 216.2 pounds (15 stone 6.2 pounds, 98.1 kg)
Steps taken: 7,874

And quite randomly down again today. Having stayed in yesterday, I was determined to do something today, even though there was a lot of rain around. After only a little bit of dithering, I decided a trip to the National Railway Museum in York would do the job. It was raining when I left home, but was dry when I arrived in York. That didn’t last, as within minutes of me entering the museum, it started to seriously rain – I could hear it hitting the roof of the Station Hall, and the odd bit of thunder was pretty loud, too…

So I spent a pleasant few hours wandering around, watching some of the videos, reading information boards, looking at some quite magnificent engines and taking photographs. As I wasn’t going to leave in a hurry, and I generally like to spend some money at the museum[1], I had lunch in the cafe in the Great Hall. I’d selected a sandwich and a bottle of local beer (small brewery located inside the city wall, must investigate them further at some point), when I spotted the fancy sausage rolls, so I had one of those as well:

Lunch

Lunch

Aperture: ƒ/2.2
Shutter speed: 1/30s
Focal length: 4.15mm
ISO: 250
Location: 53° 57.64′ 0″ N 1° 5.7815′ 0″ W
Taken: 7 November, 2014

More photos were taken, including this one of the nicely streamlined Duchess of Hamilton, currently placed in what I can’t help thinking of as Mallard‘s spot.

Duchess of Hamilton

Duchess of Hamilton

Camera: X-T1
Aperture: ƒ/4.3
Shutter speed: 1/25s
Focal length: 29.3mm
ISO: 6400
Taken: 7 November, 2014

Once I’d finished my wander, I took a quick walk through the rain to the station and got the next train home to an altogether drier Newcastle.

[1] Entry is free, and it’s well worth either buying something or making a donation to help keep it going