Weight and Stuff Report – 25 April 2016

Weight: 223.9 pounds (15 stone 13.9 pounds, 101.6 kg)
Steps taken: 1,779

Gasp, shock, down again, taking me a whisker below the psychologicackle 16 stone mark for the first time in a while. Just need to lose a couple more of those…

Just experienced some odd weather coming home. When I left the office, the sky was mostly clear, the sun was shining, the birds were coughing, etc. As the bus crossed the Tyne, I saw some wet looking clouds in the distance. Then it started to get a bit damp. Then it snowed a bit. And now it’s cleared up again. I think it was a rogue cloud having a bit of fun, or something.

This is another X70 shot – unlike the others, I have made some adjustments to this one – the camera had done a good job of getting some detail in the relatively dark interior of Central Arcade, but in doing so, overexposed the bright scene outside. A minor tweak in Lightroom sorted that out.

Byron

Byron

Camera X70
Aperture ƒ/10
Shutter speed 1/60s
Focal length 18.5mm
ISO 400
Taken 13:03, 23 April, 2016

Weight and Stuff Report – 24 April 2016

Weight: 225 pounds (16 stone 1 pounds, 102.1 kg)
Steps taken: Hardly any, really

Down a wee bit today, which is good for a weekend, or something.

Here’s another from the hip Newcastle street photo

Grey Street

Grey Street

Camera X70
Aperture ƒ/8
Shutter speed 1/400s
Focal length 18.5mm
ISO 200
Taken 12:53, 23 April, 2016

Fujifilm X70 digital camera

Look, I don’t have an addiction to Fujifilm cameras. I just like them, that’s all. Observant readers who look at the EXIF data below my images on this site[1] might have spotted a few images where the camera model reads “X70” and might have guessed that I’d succumbed to temptation and added another toy to my collection. And they’d be right. I blame Jessop’s for having it out on display where I could pick it up and play with it[2] and making me buy it minutes later. Or maybe I blame Fujifilm for making nice cameras.

Anyway, what we have here is, more or less, a smaller (and cheaper) companion to the lovely X100 series. It lacks the X100/X100S/X100T hybrid viewfinder, indeed it lacks any kind of viewfinder at all[3], so you have to compose using the LCD display. This is made much easier by it having a good tilt range – it can flip right around to face the front should you be inclined to take self-portaits[4], where it automatically inverts the display so it’s the right way up.

The lens is a fixed-focus 18.5mm, equivalent to 28mm on a full-frame camera, so the field of view is moderately wide – noticeably wider than the X100’s 23mm (equivalent to 35mm, etc, etc), with a maximum aperture of f/2.8, down from f/2 on the X100. It shares the X100’s nicely clicky aperture dial, which in automatic modes doubles as a controller for other settings (user selectable, nice).

On the top plate you’ll find the exposure setting and exposure compensation dials, the usual shutter release (not threaded for an old-school cable release this time) surrounded by the on/off switch, a function button that defaults to video recording and two new buttons – there’s a switch that flicks between fully automatic and whatever setting you have selected with the dials, and another function button that selects the drive mode (and there are the usual selection of those (still image, continuous shooting, bracketing, advanced photo filters, etc, etc). The back has the usual Fujifilm Menu/OK button with selectors around it, the handy Q button for getting to loads of settings from one screen, a combined AE-L/AF-L button (set it to your liking in the menu), a display mode/back button and another function button which defaults to WiFi function. Above the tilting screen you’ll find the image playback and delete buttons. And finally, on the front you’ll find the focus mode switch.

As it’s quite a small camera, the moderately large handgrip is welcome – I’ve found that it balances well in my quite large hands. Apart from that, if you’ve used any other Fujifilm cameras, you’ll know what to expect from the handling and general usability.

It uses the same NP-95 battery as the X100 series (Fujifilm are nice like that), and you might want to be aware that the charger supplied is of the USB variety – it charges with the battery in the camera. If you’ve already got an X100 and some spare batteries that’s probably not an issue, of course, but if you haven’t, you might want to budget for a normal charger.

While out and about today, I had a play in a variety of conditions, and I’m beginning to get the idea of how to get good results. It works really well with the display tilted to horizontal, and with the camera held low for good old-fashioned shoot from the hip street photography as in this unedited JPG

Shoot from the hip (SOOC)

Shoot from the hip (SOOC)

Camera X70
Aperture ƒ/8
Shutter speed 1/350s
Focal length 18.5mm
ISO 200
Taken 12:52, 23 April, 2016

Or indeed this one

Monument

Monument

Camera X70
Aperture ƒ/8
Shutter speed 1/550s
Focal length 18.5mm
ISO 200
Taken 12:54, 23 April, 2016

I tend to regard Central Arcade as a good place to test cameras – the light from the glass roof can be overwhelming, but I think it’s done nicely here:

Central Arcade

Central Arcade

Camera X70
Aperture ƒ/10
Shutter speed 1/60s
Focal length 18.5mm
ISO 250
Taken 12:58, 23 April, 2016

So, on its first proper outing, the X70 has made me quite happy. It’s small enough to slip into a pocket or indeed carry everywhere you go. Not as flexible as a camera with a zoom lens perhaps, but that just makes things more interesting…

 

[1] Those of you who never get past the couple of lines shown on Facebook won’t see that…
[2] This is such a nice thing to do…
[3] Though a hotshoe accessory one will be available
[4] It’s much too nice a camera to call them “selfies”

Weight and Stuff Report – 23 April 2016

Weight: 225.2 pounds (16 stone 1.2 pounds, 102.2 kg)
Steps taken: 7,081

Down a bit today…

I managed to get out a bit today and commit some random acts of photography. Having just missed a bus, I popped into the park for a few minutes, then went into Newcastle. I moved on to  the Metrocentre for a quick look around, after which came the interesting bit. I finally remembered that the restored section of Dunston Staiths[1] are now open to the public at weekends, so took a bus back that stops in the right vicinity.

I had a wander around the Staiths in glorious solitude – the last time I was there was on a heritage weekend open day thingy when loads of people were there. It was nice to have the huge wooden structure to myself this time. After that, I went back to the bus stop, just in time to dodge the rain. And then I came home. Multiple photos will follow over the next few days, but for the moment, here’s a view of the Staiths:

Tide's out

Tide’s out

Camera X70
Aperture ƒ/11
Shutter speed 1/150s
Focal length 18.5mm
ISO 200
Taken 14:20, 23 April, 2016

[1] Very large wooden structure formerly used for loading coal onto ships on the Tyne. A section was destroyed by fire so there’s a gap at its East end. A restoration and preservation programme is in place, starting at the other end.

Robert Rankin – East of Ealing

And here we are with the third book in the legendary[1] Brentford Trilogy, as my great Robert Rankin Re-read-athon creaks along. First published in 1984, this involves yet more apocalyptic goings-on in the famous[2] London borough. Readers who survived the experience of The Brentford Triangle may be either relieved or confused to find that there are no signs of the devastation and destruction[3] that occurred in that book. Well, confusion s part of the Rankin package, so you’ll just have to get used to it. Has some cosmic reset button been pressed, or is it, as Douglas Adams might have said, just life[4]? It’s probably best not to think about such matters and just get on with the story. Oh, and you’d better get used to pun-loaded titles. There will be more…

Everything appears to be being taken over by a company calling itself Latienos & Romiith. They appear to be behind the scheme to abolish actual cash and label everyone with barcodes, which as is correctly pointed out, have eighteen bars split into three groups of six. Six Six Six, even. And yes, these marks are indeed placed on either the right hand or the forehead, which comes as a Revelation[5] to our heroes Pooley and Omally, especially after Pooley manages to win an almost incalculable fortune from his six-horse accumulator bet, and when he’s taken the huge amount of money to the bank, finds the only way he can get at it is via his new barcode.

Now that might be bad enough, but there’s also the little matter of the enormous Latienos and Romiith building springing up in Brentford. And the forcefield thingy separating the borough from the outside world. And people being replaced by evil robotic replicas. And, as they say, much more, not least Sherlock Holmes, who’s prematurely, if usefully, revived from suspended animation.

Much madness follows, with the inventive Norman coming up with his own replica and a time machine of the H G Wells variety, which might come in handy…

The whole thing is utterly bonkers, as you might expect. And if the ending has you saying “eh? what? how? when? whither? whence?”, you won’t be alone.

According to I, Robert, after this book, both he and his editor were shown the door by the then publisher on grounds of low sales. Shocking.

[1] Must be, it says so on the cover
[2] It’s got all these books written about it!
[3] Decimation optional
[4] Don’t talk to me about life, etc
[5] Sorry[6], had to be done
[6] Not.

Weight and Stuff Report – 22 April 2016

Weight: 225.6 pounds (16 stone 1.6 pounds, 102.3 kg)
Steps taken: 2,913

Back up a bit today, mutter.

Here’s a nice bit of silliness from the excellent Good Times sandwich shop on Grey Street[1], where I buy my lunch more often than not. And the occasional Friday morning sausage sandwich, too. Good food, nice people!

Bargain!

Bargain!

Camera iPhone 6s
Aperture ƒ/2.2
Shutter speed 1/105s
Focal length 4.15mm
ISO 25
Taken 13:13, 21 April, 2016
Location 54° 58.2567′ 0″ N 1° 36.6392′ 0″ W

[1] Free plug!

Weight and Stuff Report – 21 April 2016

Weight: 224 pounds (16 stone, 101.6 kg)
Steps taken: 1,816

Down again today…

As a special treat for my brother[1], who likes this kind of thing, here’s Cullercoats Lifeboat Station, which I’ve given a sort of old slightly faded postcard look

Cullercoats

Cullercoats

Camera X-T1
Aperture ƒ/8
Shutter speed 1/800s
Focal length 35.3mm
ISO 400
Taken 12:47, 9 April, 2016
Location 55° 2.1145′ 0″ N 1° 25.9693′ 0″ W

[1] Hi Geoff  :wave:

Weight and Stuff Report – 20 April 2016

Weight: 225 pounds (16 stone 1 pounds, 102.1 kg)
Steps taken: 1,808

Hmmm, back up a bit today, but still lower than the last few weeks…

I had a bit of a play with the X-T1 and the 100-400mm lens last night. This is a hand-held shot, so it’s not as sharp as it could have been, but the subject just refused to get into a position where I could use the tripod and point the lens out of my window. This is an uncropped JPG, with no post-preocessing other than being reduced in size.

Hooowlllll

Hooowlllll

Camera X-T1
Aperture ƒ/8
Shutter speed 1/1000s
Focal length 560mm
ISO 640
Taken 21:03, 19 April, 2016

Weight and Stuff Report – 19 April 2016

Weight: 224.2 pounds (16 stone 0.2 pounds, 101.7 kg)
Steps taken: 3,371

What’s this? Down again? Could my secret Cunning Plan be working?

It was a bit of a long day at work – in early setting up things for our new phone system, which all went very well, despite the best efforts of telecom companies to make a mess of transferring numbers.

Here’s a wiiiiiiiiide view of Berwick:

Berwick

Berwick

Camera X-T1
Aperture ƒ/11
Shutter speed 1/500s
Focal length 18mm
ISO 250
Taken 12:42, 5 September, 2015
Location 55° 46.0084′ 0″ N 1° 59.994′ 0″ W

Weight and Stuff Report – 18 April 2016

Weight: 224.9 pounds (16 stone 0.9 pounds, 102 kg)
Steps taken: 3,404

What’s this? Down again? Amazing!

A bit more walking today for a couple of reasons. We’ve had yetaotherofficerearrangement[1] which means my desk is now several miles from the door and indeed the kitchen. And I did manage a short walk at lunchtime to give a test to a little toy that’s still waiting for a proper day out. Here’s a sample

Bridges

Bridges

Camera X70
Aperture ƒ/11
Shutter speed 1/210s
Focal length 18.5mm
ISO 200
Taken 13:17, 18 April, 2016

[1] Presented as one word to indicate the attached muttering